Power Points and Voltage in the Middle East

One thing that is certainly not clear in the Middle East is what type of power points to expect and voltage for powering up your much-needed devices!   There are no standards across the region, and in fact, you will find some countries have multiple plugs, even within the same room!

What power sockets and voltage will I find in the Middle East

Your safest bet is to travel with a good universal adaptor (and a power board that comes with it a handy addition) but here’s a run through of the different types you can expect to find across the regions


Click here to find Universal Travel Adaptors on Amazon 



Do you need a voltage converter?

Generally, if the standard voltage of the country you are visiting is 230V you can use your appliances that are between 220 – 240V (eg Australian, European and most of Asia / Africa).

If your country’s appliances are 100v-127V like in most of the Americas you will likely need a voltage converter to use any of your own appliances while travelling.

Find Voltage converters on Amazon 



Most common socket types in the Middle East region explained

Type A – Most common to the Americas with 2 straight vertical pins. Can only take A Plugs

Type B – Similar to Type A with a 3rd grounding pin. Can also take Plug A

Type C – Standard “Euro” with 2 round pins.  These sockets can also take Plug E and Plug F

Type D – 3 large round pins, common to India, Sri Lanka and some parts of Africa

Type E –  Similar to Euro round with 3 pins

Type F – Common to plugs in Type C and Type E

FURTHER READING
What should I expect taking a baby to Dubai?

Type G – British 3 rectangular pin

Type H – Unique to Israel 3 oval shaped pins


Guide to plugs you will find by country in the Middle East

Bahrain

  • Standard voltage 230v
  • Sockets are Type G British

Egypt

  • Standard voltage 220V
  • Sockets are Type C and Type F

Iran

  • Standard voltage 220V
  • Socket Type C Standard Euro which can also take Plugs E and F.
  • Socket Type F which can work with Plugs C and E

Israel

  • Standard voltage 230V
  • They have their own unique Type H plugs (3 oval plugs) but Type C Euro plugs should work

Jordan

  • Standard voltage 230V
  • Sockets vary a lot!  You will find Type C (Euro two pin), Type D (Fat three pin common in India/Sri Lanka), Type F, Type G (British rectangular three pin), Type J European three pin – one country you definitely need a multi-converter!

Kuwait

  • Standard voltage 240V
  • Sockets Type G British 3 pin rectangular

Lebanon

  • Standard voltage 220V
  • Sockets take your pick! You’ll find Type A & B (American 2 & 3 pin), Type C & Type E (Euro 2 & 3 pin), Type D (Fat 3 pin) and Type G (British rectangular 3 pin), pack the converter!

Oman

  • Standard voltage 240V
  • Sockets Type G British 3 pin rectangular

Qatar

  • Standard voltage 240V
  • Sockets are all most commonly Type G British but you will find an occasion Type D

Saudi Arabia

  • Standard voltage is 110/220V.
  • You’ll find several socket types including Type A (2 pin North American), Type B (3 pin North America, will take a plug A), Type C (which will also take plug E and F) as well as Type G British 3 pin rectangular.

Turkey

  • Standard voltage is 220V
  • Sockets are Type F which can take Plug types C & E

United Arab Emirates

  • Standard voltage is 220V
  • Sockets are almost always a Type G (British).  Very occasionally you may still find a Type C or Type D
FURTHER READING
When is the best time for families to visit Egypt?



Top Travellers Tip

We always travel with our own universal multi plugboard and adaptor.  This allows us to power multiple electronic devices from phones to cameras with only one master plug needed for the wall socket.

universal plug powerboard - essential for family travellers in the Middle East where there are multiple socket types | #traveltips #middleeast

 

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